Types Of Ships In Merchant Navy

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Types Of Ships In Merchant Navy: Hi everyone i e’m going to tell Types Of Ships In Merchant Navy.

Types Of Ships In Merchant Navy

There are many types of ship in merchant navy. Now we discuss about it in brief

1.  Dry Cargo Ship

cargo ship or freighter is any sort of ship or vessel that carries cargo, goods, and materials from one port to another. Thousands of cargo carriers ply the world’s seas and oceans each year; they handle the bulk of international trade. Cargo ships are usually specially designed for the task, often being equipped with cranes and other mechanisms to load and unload, and come in all sizes.

2. Bulk Carrier

@ Nremarks

 

bulk carrier is an ocean-going vessel used to transport bulk cargo items such as iron ore, bauxite, coal, cement, grain ,wheat and similar cargo. Bulk carriers can be recognized by large box-like hatches on deck, designed to slide outboard or fold fore-and-aft to enable access for loading or discharging cargo. The dimensions of bulk carriers are often determined by the ports and sea routes that they need to serve, and by the maximum width of the Panama Canal. Most lakes are too small to accommodate bulk carriers, but a large fleet of lake freighters has been plying the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway of North America for over a century.

3. CONTAINER SHIP

Container ships are cargo ships that carry all of their load in truck-size intermodal container in a technique called containerization. They are a common means of commercial intermodal freight transport and now carry most seagoing non-bulk cargo.

Container ship capacity is measured in twenty-foot equivalent units (TEU). Typical loads are a mix of 20-foot and 40-foot (2-TEU) ISO-standard containers, with the latter predominant.

4.TANKERS SHIP

Tanker ship are many types like

  1. Oil tanker
  2. chemical tanker
  3. gas tanker

tanker is a ship designed to transport liquids in bulk.

Oil tankers for the transport of fluids, such as crude oil, petroleum products, liquefied petroleum gas, liquefied natural gas and chemicals, also vegetable oils, wine and other food – the tanker sector comprises one third of the world tonnage.

Tankers can range in size from several hundred tons, designed to serve small harbors and coastal settlements, to several hundred thousand tons, with these being designed for long-range haulage. A wide range of products are carried by tankers, including:

  • hydrocarbon products such as oil, LPG, and LNG
  • Chemicals, such as ammonia, chlorine, and styrene monomer
  • fresh water
  • wine

Different products require different handling and transport, thus special types of tankers have been built, such as “chemical tankers” and “oil tankers”. Gas Carriers such as “LNG carriers” as they are typically known, are a relatively rare tanker designed to carry liquefied natural gas.

Among oil tankers, supertankers were designed for carrying oil around the Horn of Africa from the Middle East; the FSO Knock Nevis being the largest vessel in the world, a ULCC supertanker formerly known as Jahre Viking (Seawise Giant). It has a dead weight of 565 thousand metric tons and length of about 458 meters. The use of such large ships is in fact very unprofitable, due to the inability to operate them at full cargo capacity; hence, the production of supertankers has currently ceased. Today’s largest oil tankers in comparison by gross tonnage are TI EuropeTI AsiaTI Oceania, which are the largest sailing vessels today. But even with their dead weight of 441,585 metric tons, sailing as VLCC most of the time, they do not use more than 70% of their total capacity.

Apart from pipeline transport, tankers are the only method for transporting large quantities of oil, although such tankers have caused large environmental disasters when sinking close to coastal regions, causing oil spills. See BraerErikaExxon ValdezPrestige and Torrey Canyon for examples of tankers that have been involved in oil spills.

5. CRUISE LINER SHIP

cruise ship or cruise liner is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, where the voyage itself and the ship’s amenities are a part of the experience, as well as the different destinations along the way, i.e., ports of call. Transportation is not the only purpose of cruising, particularly on cruises that return passengers to their originating port (also known as a closed-loop cruise), with the ports of call usually in a specified region of a continent.

6. RO-RO SHIP

Roll-on/roll-off (RO-RO or ro-ro) ships are vessels designed to carry wheeled cargo, such as cars, trucks, semi-trailer trucks, trailers, and railroad cars, that are driven on and off the ship on their own wheels or using a platform vehicle, such as a self-propelled modular transporter. This is in contrast to lift-on/lift-off (Lo-Lo) vessels, which use a crane to load and unload cargo.

RO-RO vessels have either built-in or shore-based ramps that allow the cargo to be efficiently rolled on and off the vessel when in port. While smaller ferries that operate across rivers and other short distances often have built-in ramps, the term RO-RO is generally reserved for large oceangoing vessels. The ramps and doors may be located in stern, bow or sides, or any combination thereof

7. TUGS

tug (tugboat) is a boat or ship that maneuvers vessels by pushing or towing them. Tugs move vessels that either should not move by themselves, such as ships in a crowded harbor or a narrow canal, or those that cannot move by themselves, such as barges, disabled ships, log rafts, or oil platforms. Tugboats are powerful for their size and strongly built, and some are ocean-going. Some tugboats serve as icebreakers or salvage boats. Early tugboats had steam engines, but today most have diesel engines. Many tugboats have firefighting monitors, allowing them to assist in firefighting, especially in harbors.

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